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Heating

Ventilation

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By Governor Jim Douglas

Every Vermont family is facing the realities of soaring fuel costs—but Vermont is fighting back.  That is why I launched a comprehensive and collaborative program—the Vermont Fuel and Food Partnership—to help Vermonters address increasing home heating, gasoline and food costs by marshalling every available resource in our state.

Solving these problems requires an effort that goes beyond government alone and we're fortunate to have a strong network of community-based organizations and programs to help Vermonters when times get tough.  Coupled with the programs and service available from local, state and federal governments and our other private and non-profit partners, we can address this challenge and succeed.

The Fuel and Food Partnership will bring together all of the creativity, compassion, information and resources in our state to ensure that we make the most of every dollar and that no Vermonter is left in the cold.   It will provide Vermonters, through a single entry, access to every available option and empower them with the knowledge they need to lower their energy bills and reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. 

To harness all available resources I established a cabinet-level task force co-chaired by Lt. Governor Brian Dubie.  I have asked them to focus every effort and every resource Vermont can bring to bear to help manage the effects of higher energy costs on Vermont families.  

These are difficult times for working families, but Vermont has faced these kinds of challenges before, and is a national example of how deep community roots and a strong commitment to seeking new solutions can resolve even the most difficult challenges. I know that the strength and determination of Vermonters will lead us past these difficult times and leave us with a state that is stronger and more energy independent than ever before.

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) is the technology of indoor and vehicular environmental comfort. Its goal is to provide thermal comfort and acceptable indoor air quality. HVAC system design is a subdiscipline of mechanical engineering, based on the principles of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer. "Refrigeration" is sometimes added to the field's abbreviation, as HVAC&R or HVACR or "ventilation" is dropped, as in HACR (as in the designation of HACR-rated circuit breakers).

HVAC is an important part of residential structures such as single family homes, apartment buildings, hotels and senior living facilities, medium to large industrial and office buildings such as skyscrapers and hospitals, vehicles such as cars, trains, airplanes, ships and submarines, and in marine environments, where safe and healthy building conditions are regulated with respect to temperature and humidity, using fresh air from outdoors.

Ventilating or ventilation (the V in HVAC) is the process of exchanging or replacing air in any space to provide high indoor air quality which involves temperature control, oxygen replenishment, and removal of moisture, odors, smoke, heat, dust, airborne bacteria, carbon dioxide, and other gases. Ventilation removes unpleasant smells and excessive moisture, introduces outside air, keeps interior building air circulating, and prevents stagnation of the interior air.

Ventilation includes both the exchange of air to the outside as well as circulation of air within the building. It is one of the most important factors for maintaining acceptable indoor air quality in buildings. Methods for ventilating a building may be divided into mechanical/forced and natural types.

HVAC is based on inventions and discoveries made by Nikolay Lvov, Michael Faraday, Willis Carrier, Edwin Ruud, Reuben Trane, James Joule, William Rankine, Sadi Carnot, and many others.

Multiple inventions within this time frame preceded the beginnings of first comfort air conditioning system, which was designed in 1902 by Alfred Wolff (Cooper, 2003) for the New York Stock Exchange, while Willis Carrier equipped the Sacketts-Wilhems Printing Company with the process AC unit the same year. Coyne College was the first school to offer HVAC training in 1899.

The invention of the components of HVAC systems went hand-in-hand with the industrial revolution, and new methods of modernization, higher efficiency, and system control are constantly being introduced by companies and inventors worldwide.